Weston MA

Weston is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States in the Boston metro area. The population of Weston, as of the 2010 U.S. Census, was 11,261.[1]

Weston is among the 10 most affluent towns with 1,000 or more households in the United States and is the third-most affluent town with a population of at least 10,000 in the United States.[2] House prices range between 2 million to upwards of 12 and 18 million USD. It is the only town in the Boston Area to have private roads, with state of the art police patrolling 24/7.

Despite a population of just 11,261, Weston's area is only slightly smaller than that of its neighbor town, Newton, Massachusetts which accounts for a much higher population of about 90,000. As a result, Weston's houses are on average much larger than those present in nearby towns, with considerable space between each individual residence. It has one of the lowest crime rate among Metro-west Boston suburbs.

Weston was a dry town from 1838 until 2008.[3] Incorporated in 1713, the town is located on a rugged upland plateau.

History

The town of Weston was originally established as the West Precinct of Watertown in 1698. The town was separately incorporated as the town of Weston in 1713.

Weston is located on a rugged upland plateau. Early settlers discovered that the amount of useful agricultural land was limited as was the waterpower potential in the town. But colonists moving in from Watertown in the mid-17th century established scattered farms in Weston, and by 1679, a sawmill, several taverns, some doctors, and according to the historians, "probably some lawyers," had settled in Weston.

By the 18th century, residents were profiting by the traffic on the Boston Post Road. Taverns of great historic importance were established on the Road. The Golden Ball Tavern, built in 1750, and the Josiah Smith Tavern, built in 1757, still exist in the town. Unfortunately, commercial stagnation followed the loss of business after the opening of the Worcester Turnpike in 1810 drew commercial traffic from the Boston Post Road. Townspeople turned to boot and shoe making, and the manufacturing of cotton and woolen mill machinery. By 1870, substantial country estates were being built in Weston by Bostonians, establishing a prosperous residential character for the town. Farming continued to be a significant support for the local economy, and an organ factory opened in 1886 which employed some residents. The Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir were built in 1903 and the Hultman Aqueduct followed in 1938 to bring Quabbin Reservoir water into Boston. In exchange, Boston residents continued to build homes in Weston, many of them architect designed.

Some famous architects such as McKim and Richardson designed luxurious houses in the town, which witnessed a rapid increase in population from 1920 to 1935, and then again after World War II. The Boston oriented suburbanization has continued as a major factor in the town's development. Residents are very proud of the town's school system and the handsome homes in quiet, well-kept neighborhoods, but tend to brush off the town's reputation as one of the most affluent communities in the state. Weston has carefully retained significant amounts of open space and maintains over 60 miles of hiking and horseback riding trails, playgrounds, ball fields, golf courses and cross-country skiing areas.[5][6]

Weston was also the home of the E. and G.G. Hook & Hastings organ company until a fire destroyed the factory in the early 1900s. After the fire broke out the fire department responded however the water source (Stony Brook) was just on the other side of the railroad tracks. As the firemen were fighting the fire a train came along and cut all the hoses leaving the firemen without water and having to scurry to replace the cut hoses. Unfortunately for the factory this required more time and the fire consumed the wooden factory.

Weston is also home to many important events regarding the revolutionary war, with the most important being a through way for the Noble Train of Artillery led by Henry Knox.[7] Along with several other towns along the route that Knox took, Weston serves as an important reminder of this selfless and punishing act that helped the revolutionaries win the war.

Courtesy of Wikipedia.com

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Updated: 18th December, 2018 11:10 PM.